I Just Need a Break

I once taught a student with a very distinctive voice. His voice was one of a kind and for some reason it was like a beacon for me. No matter where this student was; in the lunchroom, gym, back of the classroom, front of the classroom, in the room next door; my brain honed in on this voice and I could hear what this student was saying, who he was talking to, and I could determine, just by the lilt of a word, what kind of mood he was in. I could not escape this voice because this boy was the type of kid who talked constantly….even when he was by himself. I could be teaching a lesson, the class could be engaged, maybe they would be working on a project, having a discussion, or silent reading, it didn’t matter because this kid was talking. Now you have to understand that this student was pretty smart. When he was on task, he could be a great contributor, when his stories and responses were insightful, but his mouth got in the way. I can still, to this day hear myself blurting out, “Please, just stop talking for one second!” “Please!!!! I just need a break!” “Would you please, just take a breath!” He would look startled, maybe shake his head, but inevitably he would just start talking again.

This student had ADHD. He was not my first student to have ADHD, but was memorable because for me, his diagnosis proved to be a great challenge in my classroom, not only for him, but for me. If you have ever worked in a typical classroom, you know that within every group of students there are those that stand out, that are loud, that never stop fidgeting, that can’t stay organized to save their lives, and those that have no power whatsoever to stay focused. If you’ve been in education for awhile, I bet you have noticed that the number of these special students have multiplied. There are no longer one or two, but now you have five, six, ten. I like to tell parents who have these little guys and gals that they are not alone, these students are the norm rather than the exception and fellow educators, I want to tell you that we have to adjust, we have to embrace their learning differences, and we have to accommodate….in the typical classroom.

If you stay abreast of the latest research and if you are acquainted with all the new methods, theories, and strategies out there, this is old news. Classroom dynamics are changing all across America and we can no longer look to the intervention specialist to absolve us from our struggles. So I guess I’m proposing that if we want to make a difference, if we want our students to achieve in our classrooms, if we want students to leave our classrooms knowing that they had a teacher that truly cared about them, then we have to adapt our typical classroom to fit the needs of our atypical students.

Everyone learns differently. All teachers were taught about the various “modalities”. We know that there are tactile learners, visual learners, auditory learners and more. We know this, yet are we using this knowledge to redevelop lessons, to redefine the way we teach curriculum, to breakdown concepts so that all in our classrooms will learn? Students with ADHD need structure and routine. They need multiple breaks and work well with hands-on tasks. These children need all the help they can get with developing executive functioning skills so colored folders work, writing assignments on the board works, creating checklists and keeping all of their passwords handy works. Chunking information, tasks, assessments, and only requiring necessary assignments for practice works. Guided notes, developing short term goals, and limiting free time works. Do your homework, keep your records, and brainstorm with past teachers to see what is best for the child now sitting in your room. These children are told “No” and “Stop” and “Settle down” so much. Remember to praise, high five, give them a sticker for accomplishments. Make them feel loved, accepted, and cherished inside the walls of your classroom. Find what they are good at and let them fly!

That boy, the one with the voice, well I ended up teaching him for four years, and although there were times when I just needed a break, I realized that he had those moments too. We got to know one another and I realized that he was a great big brother and friend. He made great strides in reading and did really well on oral assessments and tests with multiple choice and short answer. His math skills improved with practice and little by little he began to believe in himself. I do not believe that all ADHD children should be on medication, but I do believe that some children thrive on the right meds, but with this kid, it didn’t matter. His parents couldn’t afford it so I was made or forced to try other techniques for him. He made me work hard and frankly there was no way I could push him off to the side and ignore him. I had to find what worked for him and I can honestly say that when he left my school I truly missed him. I’m happy to say that he’s doing great and I’m glad when I run into him. I can feel confident knowing that I did everything I could to make him succeed and this is good because knowing this allows me to sleep at night.


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