In Loving Memory

We all have role models, mentors, those that impact our lives for the better, whether professionally or personally. I am lucky enough to have a few in the world of education. One lady whom I met at Ashland University was a professor of mine for three leadership classes. During my semesters with her, she inspired and motivated me to be a better educator.

Dr. Carol Engler was a special person because she was one of those people who could walk into a room and immediately garner everyone’s attention. The first time I saw her, she was wearing a leather skirt and had the most amazing shoes. Her hair was bright red and her curls were wild and untamed. I couldn’t take my eyes off of her. Then she spoke. This lady knew what she was talking about and she knew how to get the class involved and invested. After the first class I knew that I would take every class she taught and I did. Her energy was catchy and her love of education was infectious. Every assignment we had to do was necessary and I learned a lot from her.

Carol died from cancer this past week.

This one person clearly had a positive influence on so many, and she touched my life and I will remember her always. I was so lucky to have experienced her brilliance and light. As teachers and administrators we all have this insane responsibility to also impact others in positive ways and we have to take that responsibility very seriously. Every word and action we take with children will influence their lives. Educators can determine whether a person experiences future success or failure. Research has proven this time and time again.

There are no excuses for performing your job in education part way. You can’t “kind of” be invested. As a teacher you have to take on personal responsibility for the successes and failures in your classroom. As an administrator you have to advocate for your students and make sure that every single teacher is working hard to create innovative and fun lessons in their classrooms. There is no bare minimum in education. Dr. Engler left a legacy in education of commitment and joy in the craft of teaching and learning. I am so thankful that I had to opportunity to learn from her.


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